Can Music Heal You? We Put It To The Test

There has been a lot of study regarding the power of music and its ability to help you heal, with a lot saying that there is something to it. But how effective is the use of music for healing, we looked into this and conducted an experiment. We believe in the power of music and that if we find the type of music that is the most effective when it comes to healing,  it could be used as a way to help patients in hospitals recover faster, maybe through piping in the music throughout the establishment.

music-healing

The concept that music has the power to heal has been around since ancient times, with some mentions of it in ancient Greek text. The idea is that either the calming and relaxing effect of music allows people to amplify the body’s ability to heal, or that a specific frequency from music directly stimulates the ability of your cells healing. Either way the both concepts of music healing the body have some scientific points, coupled with favorable experimental results and testimonies, the idea of healing through music is gaining more and more attention from many in the field of alternative medicine. So much so, that there are professional that offers this treatment, called music therapist.

Though we called it an experiment earlier, we merely partnered up with some cksociety cosmetic surgeons, and asked if we could talk to some of their recovering patients regarding the matter, luckily enough a few replied and were glad to help out with the experiment. We formed several teams, with one being a control group and the others being different musical genre. Each group would listen to their assigned genre a few hours a day while relaxing,  the results were interesting, a few members of each people in the group had a faster rate of recovery compared to the control group, what puzzled us though was why was it that only a few members of each group had any affect. We later discovered that those who recovered faster were fond of their assigned musical genre. Our conclusion is that in order to have significant effect, the patient merely needs to listen to the music they like.

Though the experiment was somewhat successful, it only means that there is no general genre we could pipe in through hospitals to help people recover. Though we could still play individual music per room, it would require soundproofing for each individual room.

In the end, music might actually have the potential to heal people. The experiment we conducted was very informal and has to be recreated to have a more conclusive result. We plan in the future to hold the experiment with the help with medical professionals and a larger group to study, looking through the whole concept deeper. For now though, we consider this as proof that music can definitely help promote healing and that it should be used as a way to recover faster.